Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Participatory 3D Modelling (P3DM)

While in Venice at the 2007 WSA Awards, I learnt of an amazing project in Fiji which won the award for the e-culture section. more>>

It used participatory 3D modelling to capture the stories around a landscape. I am really interested in using this method as a way to uncover local stories and informal names of land features in our district, particularly from iwi. I especially like the opportunity for inter-generational interactions in the passing down of local knowledge. What I'd really like to do is then link this model into the digital content being created in Kete Horowhenua using GPS coordinates to pull it all together...

This from Wikipedia:
"Participatory 3D Modelling (P3DM) is a community-based mapping method which integrates local spatial knowledge with data on elevation of the land and depth of the sea to produce stand-alone, scaled and geo-referenced relief models. Essentially based on local spatial knowledge, land use and cover, and other features are depicted by informants on the model by the use of pushpins (points), yarns (lines) and paints (polygons). On completion, a scaled and geo-referenced grid is applied to facilitate data extraction or importation. Data depicted on the model are extracted, digitised and plotted. On completion of the exercise the model remains with the community."
I was given a CDRom at WSA by Giacomo Rambaldi, from the series: Participatory Learning and Action. Called "54. Mapping for change : practice, technologies and communication", it includes a number of very interesting articles and case studies. The contents are licensed under a Creative Commons license and so I will make them available from the kete.net project site.

The Wikipedia article contains a bunch of links including this video presentation:

2 comments:

Holly Ashley, PLA Co-editor said...

Hi there. The full English text versions of all the articles in the special issue can be downloaded as PDFs free online here: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/iiedpla/pla/2006/00000054/00000001

Joann Ransom said...

Thanks Holly - thats fantastic.